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The Spooky Scoop: Halloween Fun Facts Infographic

Health Insurance Companies Process 1 in 5 Claims Wrong

Fun Facts for Halloween

Take a look at our latest infographic with some spooky scoop on Halloween that you might have not known. Also check out our 30 Safety Tips for Halloween for everything you need to know for this fun and frightful night. Spooky ScoopHave a Happy Halloween!!

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2 Responses to “The Spooky Scoop: Halloween Fun Facts Infographic”

  1. Hi Manny
    Does Medicare pay for palliative care consults in hospital anymore and what is the cpt code? I see the consult code has been expired but sharing the one from admitting physician in 99251-99255.
    Thanks,
    TP

    Reply
    • Tiffany the following info is directly from Medicare’s website. Hopefully it will help answer your question.

      “All visits to provide care related to the palliation and management of the terminal illness or related conditions, whether provided by hospice employees or provided under arrangement, must be reported. The two exceptions are related to General Inpatient Care and Respite care. CMS is not requiring hospices to report visit data at this time for visits made by non-hospice staff providing General Inpatient Care or respite care in contract facilities.” (http://www.cms.gov/Medicare/Medicare-Fee-for-Service-Payment/Hospice/Downloads/R2747CP.pdf)

      As Medicare no longer accepts the consult codes then you may be able to utilize the inpatient codes as follows with the appropriate –GW or –GV modifier. Here are the codes with their definitions from the AMA:

      99221
      Initial hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A detailed or comprehensive history; A detailed or comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making that is straightforward or of low complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient’s and/or family’s needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission are of low severity. Typically, 30 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient’s hospital floor or unit.
      99222
      Initial hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient’s and/or family’s needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission are of moderate severity. Typically, 50 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient’s hospital floor or unit.
      99223
      Initial hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires these 3 key components: A comprehensive history; A comprehensive examination; and Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient’s and/or family’s needs. Usually, the problem(s) requiring admission are of high severity. Typically, 70 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient’s hospital floor or unit.

      OR if not the admitting doctor then use only these codes:

      99231
      Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A problem focused interval history; A problem focused examination; Medical decision making that is straightforward or of low complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient’s and/or family’s needs. Usually, the patient is stable, recovering or improving. Typically, 15 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient’s hospital floor or unit.
      99232
      Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: An expanded problem focused interval history; An expanded problem focused examination; Medical decision making of moderate complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient’s and/or family’s needs. Usually, the patient is responding inadequately to therapy or has developed a minor complication. Typically, 25 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient’s hospital floor or unit.
      99233
      Subsequent hospital care, per day, for the evaluation and management of a patient, which requires at least 2 of these 3 key components: A detailed interval history; A detailed examination; Medical decision making of high complexity. Counseling and/or coordination of care with other physicians, other qualified health care professionals, or agencies are provided consistent with the nature of the problem(s) and the patient’s and/or family’s needs. Usually, the patient is unstable or has developed a significant complication or a significant new problem. Typically, 35 minutes are spent at the bedside and on the patient’s hospital floor or unit.

      Reply

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